Anesthesia in Cesarean section

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embarazada ANAESTHESIA IN CAESAREAN SECTION

EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA

Technically speaking, this anaesthesia is the same as for vaginal birth and has the same contraindications as the latter, the only thing that varies is the dose given.

The technique is performed in the operating theatre, where the dose is staggered until the degree of anaesthesia required is reached. The future mother mother is monitored by means of electrocardiogram, pulse oximetry and blood pressure. Once the caeseran section has been completed the mother remains in the resuscitation room for approximately one hour.

ECG

Pulse oximetry

INTRADURAL ANAESTHESIA

Intradural anaesthesia has progressed greatly in recent years, gradually overtaking epidural anaesthesia as the technique of choice in elective and emergency caesarean section provided that there is no absolute contraindication.

Advantages over Epidural Anaesthesia

  • Minimum latency time (rapid onset of action)
  • Lower failure incidence
  • Reduction in post-puncture hypotension and headache
GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

What is it?

GA is a rapid anesthetic induction technique with immediate orotracheal intubation to avert the risk of vomiting and/or gastric regurgitation. To limit maximum foetal exposure to anaesthetic agents, the induction of anesthesia is carried out with the patient prepped and the obstetric equipment "at the ready".

When is General Anaesthesia given?

General Anesthaesia is given when a regional technique is contraindicated for reasons of time, such as in acute foetal distress (AFD), bleeding or any associated maternal pathology that renders its use inadvisable.

Anaesthetic material

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